May
11
2019

Buying Chips For Online Gambling

How To Fund Your Internet Gambling Account

Buying chips and credits at online gambling web sites seems to become more difficult with each passing month. Legislative changes combine with policy changes at processing companies to create an environment that is constantly changing and sometimes difficult to keep track of.

The early days of online gambling offered few options for funding your casino or sportsbook account. Prior to the internet poker boom, most sites dealt primarily with credit card billing. A few casinos, mostly using the Microgaming software platform also used a platform by Surefire Commerce, which later became FirePay.

With few options, direct billing of credit cards remained the main option for years, despite the numerous headaches involved. The transactions were considered high risk by banks, so they carried stiff fees, and consumers would often dispute the charges if they did not win. A new alternative was desperately needed, and the PayPal electronic wallet soon stepped up to fill the void.

By the end of 2002, PayPal had been absorbed by online auction giant, eBay.com, and had ceased all internet gambling business. At this time a company called Neteller entered the market to provide an electronic wallet that catered to the online gambling industry. Although many others also entered this market over the next few years, Neteller remained the dominant force in the world of processing payments to and from online casinos, sportsbooks and poker rooms.

In March 2007, Neteller bowed out of the market due to increasing legal pressure from the United States. That is to say that the company stopped processing transactions for the US and Canadian customers that make up the majority of internet gambling customers. Since most people utilized the services provided by Neteller, the move left many wondering exactly what options are still available to them. There are, of course, several methods that are still viable options for funding an internet gambling account.

Credit Cards – It seems that the industry has come full circle, as online gambling sites are once again recommending the use of Visa and Mastercard as the primary method for funding your online gambling account.

ePassporte – ePassporte is an electronic wallet that allows you to send and receive money anonymously to anywhere in the world. The system is based on a prepaid virtual Visa card that is reloadable. You can sign up for an account at epassporte.com

Click2Pay – While ePassporte handles a number of e-commerce industries, Click2Pay is an electronic wallet that was designed specifically for the online gambling industry. This gives Click2Pay an insight into the industry that puts them ahead of the curve when compared to other payment options. Sign up for an account today at click2pay.com

Check By Mail – Old fashioned checks and money orders are always welcomed. The only downside is that you wont have credits in your gambling account immediately, since it takes time for the check to be mailed to the online gambling establishment.

There are other options available for funding gambling accounts. New methods are being added all the time. For an updated list of available options, you can contact the online casino, sportsbook or poker room of your choice. They will be more than happy to tell you the best available option for buying credits to gamble with.

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May
03
2019

Avoid Gambling Away Profit Points In Your Movie Like Casino Chips Or You Will Go Bust

I think there is a gambling streak in indie filmmakers and movie producers. Not even close to a streak like in one of my favorite gambling movies made – The Gambler (1974). Making movies is not exactly the safest bet, but the action is a rush, and payoffs can be in the millions. Not to mention making one hit indie movie can lead to studio deals where the sky is the limit. Like with professional gamblers, you have to play smart and not take avoidable risks.

I’ve read a few articles and books that have suggested one way to save money on an indie budget is to offer actors and crew members “points” (percent of movie profits) instead of giving them a paycheck, or the preferred form in the indie scene – cold hard cash. They sacrifice being paid upfront for a potential share of any profits the movie makes. On the surface this sounds appealing because hard money doesn’t have to be raised and spent to hire people.

Below the surface there are issues that make giving out points to actors and crew problematic. For many aspiring filmmakers “points” won’t feel like real money they’re dealing with.

It’s similar to people gambling with casino chips. When they’re playing with casino chips it doesn’t feel like real money, even though casino chips do represent real dollar amounts. Casino chips only become real to many people when it’s time cash them in for real money or they have to spend real money to get more.

This same attitude can be seen when giving out “points”. A person can think, “I’m making a movie now (gambling). I’ll worry about cashing out “points” (casino chips) later.

A filmmaker that’s financially shortsighted is more open to offer “points” like Halloween candy to actors and crew. When it does come time to cash in those “points” a filmmaker realizes they’ve shot themselves in the foot if their indie film is successful. Between “points” paid out to actors, crew and film investors (who always get points), they’ll be lucky to earn anything off their own creative talents and sweat equity.

What if you do end up with a hit indie movie on your hands? It nets (money the filmmaker actually receives) one million dollars in profits through some of these potential outlets.

• Theatrical Release
• Domestic DVD and Video Sales
• Sale of Foreign Distribution Rights
• VOD (video on demand) Sales
• Cable/Satellite Television Rights
• Internet Outlets

Just to illustrate the point, here is a clear-cut example. Say there is an actor or crewmember that normally might have been paid $1,000 for their work cashes in their “points.” Even one single point would be worth $10,000. Imagine repeating giving away that much of your movie’s profits on “points” given out.

A filmmaker could be in a position where the only way to get their movie done is to offer “points” to actors or crew, but be judicious when deciding how many “points” to hand out to an actor or key crewmember. Always leave meat on the bone so you can eat too.

Film investors that put up money to make a movie always receive “points.” That’s how a movie investor sees a return on their money, like in another financial investment. Enough “points” will belong to investors that put up money to produce a film without including actor and crew “points” you have to pay out too.

Do not end up a tragic character in your own real life movie that discovers they gambled their movie away. Every person involved made money, except our real life hero who made it possible. Treat “points” like your movie is already going to be a profitable venture.

This is indie filmmaker Sid Kali typing CUT TO:

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